Frankfurt Travel Guide

Frankfurt Travel Guide

Frankfurt Travel Guide

Photo by LNLNLN on Pixabay // CC0

Introduction

In the modern era, most consider Frankfurt to be a global business capital. While it excels in this role, it also has a rich history.

Its important art galleries, stunning churches, and amazing sausages make this city well worth visiting while in Germany.

Come check out our Frankfurt travel guide for inspired wanderers as we cover the best things to do in Frankfurt, Germany.

Top Attractions

On your first day in Frankfurt, start by visiting Romer, its iconic city hall. This stunning medieval-era building has served the community for over 600 years. Given the skyscrapers that define Frankfurt’s skyline today, its old-world facade stands as a bold counterpoint.

However, as a visitor, this building can only serve as a backdrop for photographs. The Romer still serves administrative functions, and thus, does not operate as a tourist attraction. However, the general area hosts a Christmas market during the holiday season, so be sure to come by then.

Next, make your way over to the Cathedral of St. Bartholomew. This imposing 328 foot tall Roman Catholic church first rose in the 14th century. From this time to the late 18th century, officials elected emperors of the Holy Roman Empire here.

Within this Romanesque cathedral’s interior, its High Altar and the Maria Schlaf Altar are the top highlights. For only 2 EUR, you can climb to the top of St. Bartholomew’s bell tower to enjoy the view from above.

Art lovers will want to include the Stadel Museum in their Frankfurt itinerary. In this gallery, you’ll get to enjoy more than 100,000 pieces stretching back over seven centuries. In particular, though, it has an excellent collection of works from the Renaissance and Baroque periods.

Artists featured here include masters like Van Eyck, Bosch, and Botticelli. To gain a full appreciation for this museum’s collection, pick up an audio guide at the entrance.

If you love the performing arts, make an effort to take in a show at the Alte Oper. Also known as the Old Opera House, Allied bombs razed this building in WWII. However, restoration efforts brought it back to its former glory. Don’t miss its frequent classical music concerts.

Other Attractions

If you enjoy international cinema, consider adding the German Film Museum to your Frankfurt touring schedule. More than just a place dedicated to German film, this museum delves into the global history of movie-making.

This institution has fun exhibits like the Green Screen Room, where you’ll see yourself in big movie moments. But, it also has technical displays that cater to the biggest film geeks. If you have two hours to kill, spend them here.

Garden lovers will love spending a few hours exploring the grounds of the Palmengarten. In its 50 acres of greenhouses, you’ll find flora that will transport you mentally to the tropics. In particular, its ferns, orchids, and palm trees stand out.

If you are travelling as a family, this place holds special appeal. In its lake, you can rent paddleboats. Meanwhile, on land, a small train also does a circuit around the garden’s grounds.

If you want to sample the finest food Frankfurt has to offer, take a stroll through Kleinmarkthalle. This 1,500 square metre market offers local produce and the finest Frankfurter sausage. However, its vendors also sell exotic foods imported from abroad.

Because of its appeal with locals, this attraction is perfect for visitors looking to experience local life. Friends and family come here daily not just to buy food, but to mingle and enjoy each other’s company.

Before leaving Frankfurt, be sure to head up the Main Tower. This plain-sounding name refers to a cylinder-shaped blue glass skyscraper that soars 656 feet above downtown.

As impressive as it is to look at, the views up top are even better. On its observation deck, you’ll get 360-degree views of the surrounding area. Admission is only 7.50 EUR, but you can get 20% off if you have the Frankfurt Card.

What To Eat

You can’t say you visited Frankfurt without having tried a Frankfurter Wurstchen. As the name suggests, it is a Frankfurt sausage. Most often, restaurants serve it with potato salad, sans bun. Back when these sausages first travelled to America, Americans knew them as Frankfurters. If that sounds familiar, you’re not wrong. It was the early name for what we know as hot dogs today.

At dinner, you’ll want to seek out a Frankfurter Rippchen. You’ll often find this cured pork cutlet dish in Frankfurt restaurants, paired with sauerkraut or mashed potatoes.

And lastly, finish off any meal with a slice of Frankfurter Kranz. This light sponge cake dates back to the 18th century. The baker who made it had an instant hit on their hands. To this day, Frankfurters enjoy it with their daily coffee.