Liverpool

Liverpool, England by CC user Nigel's Europe & beyond on FlickrIntroduction Springing to prominence in the 19th century as a centre of trade and industry during the Industrial Revolution, Liverpool has done an 180 since then to become one of England’s leading cultural centres. Birthing one of the best bands in history hasn’t hurt its reputation, and neither has the presence of the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra. Throw in sporting events like the Grand National horse race and regular matches by Liverpool FC, and you’ve got a destination in England that simply can’t afford to leave off your itinerary. Liverpool Catherdral by photo by CC user ruaraidhg on Flickr

Cultural Experiences

Begin your cultural walking tour of this city by visiting the Liverpool Cathedral. Measuring an astonishing 190 metres from end to end, this church is the longest cathedral in the world, and taking its interior into consideration, it is the fifth biggest by total area.

By virtue of the size of this Gothic Revival masterpiece, it also contains the highest and heaviest bells of any church in the world.

With lifts installed in the present day to allow the bell ringer to reach them, visitors can also ascend this tower as well, allowing them to see the hardware that summons the faithful to mass every Sunday.

Most fans of popular music are aware that one of the most successful bands in history emerged from Liverpool in the 1960’s.

An interactive museum known as The Beatles Story tells their story in an engaging fashion, through their personal effects, and an audio guide narrated by John Lennon’s sister, Julia.

There are also sections of the museum that cover the solo exploits of each band member after the breakup of the band, and a 4D theatre that takes you mind and body into the heart of Beatlemania as it existed more than 50 years ago.

Those looking to get their fine art fix will be happy to hear that the Walker Art Gallery possesses the most impressive art collection in England outside of London.

With numerous sculptures and paintings from artists as famous as Rembrandt and Peter Paul Reubens, perusing the works found here is a great way to pass an afternoon when the weather isn’t cooperating.

Albert Dock by CC user Beverley Goodwin on FlickrOther Attractions Looking for an interesting place to hang out and relax on a brilliant sunny day in Liverpool? Head down to Albert Dock, which is a refurbished warehouse/port facility that has shifted from a gritty place where trade was conducted, to a spot where locals go to see and be seen. First opened in 1846, it was the first structure in the UK to be constructed of non-wood materials, as it was made entirely of iron, stone and brick. The design of this facility was unique in that it allowed goods to be loaded/unloaded directly to and from the warehouses, ensuring Liverpool’s prosperity through the heyday of the Industrial Revolution. Apart from being the centrepiece of the Mercantile Maritime City UNESCO World Heritage Site designation, it serves today as a social hub for residents and tourists, as it contains numerous museums, hotels, bars and restaurants. If you have managed to stumble across a gorgeous summer day, truly a rare thing in much of the British Isles, do try to spend part of it at Sefton Park during your stay in Liverpool. While this former royal hunting ground is your typical getaway for local residents when they crave a dose of nature, one attraction that will draw you here as a tourist is the Palm House, which is a glass conservatory. Housing exotic plants within, and surrounded by busts and statues, it will prove to be the biggest point of interest during your visit to this park. Sports fans won’t want to leave town without attending a football match at Anfield Stadium, which is home to Liverpool FC, one of the most prestigious professional football clubs in the world. Home to the squad since 1892, it is one of the oldest stadiums in professional sports still in continuous use. Plans to replace it with a modern stadium are currently going on, though they have been plodding along at a snail’s pace for close to decade. Just the same, it is best to see a game here before construction is commenced, as Anfield Stadium isn’t getting any younger.