Turin

Turin Travel Guide

Introduction to Turin

Best known for being home to one of Christianity’s most hotly debated relics, and the 2006 Winter Olympics, Turin is a popular place to visit for those exploring Northern Italy.

Located within view of the Alps, it is also a great base for those looking to engage in mountain sports, activities and sightseeing, while retaining the amenities of an urban centre.

Cultural Experiences in Turin

Begin your time in this northern Italian city by exploring the Royal Palace of Turin. Built to house Regent Maria Christina’s son after his return from an Italian Civil War in the mid 16th century, this palace is best known for the Chapel of the Holy Shroud, which is home to the cloth that allegedly covered the body of Jesus after his death almost 2,000 years ago.

This fact easily makes this place a UNESCO World Heritage Site, but don’t just come to see the controversial cloth – the halls of this palace will forever change what inspired interior design means to you. Chandeliers, gilded trim, marble statues … you’ll be taking notes for all these changes for when you get back home.

There are a number of excellent museums in Turin that are well worth your time, but if you only have a limited amount of it to spend, start by checking out Museo Egizio.

This institution specializes in showing off a variety of Egyptian artifacts recovered over the years. They have more than 30,000 pieces in their collection, which includes mummies, papyrus scrolls, as well as the infamous Book of the Dead.

Housed in the iconic Mole Antonelliana (which is the highest brick building in Europe), the National Museum of Cinema is a fascinating exploration of the art of movie making not just in Italy, but all around the world as well.

Composed of movie props, paintings, books, and other film artifacts from across the history of motion pictures, the experience is heightened by the catwalks that snake up the interior walls of the building.

Those looking for an excellent vantage point to take awesome pictures of Turin should take the transparent glass elevator located in the centre of Mole Antonelliana to the observation deck on the roof.

With 360 degree panoramic views, getting a perfect shot of Turin’s cityscape or the front range of the Alps will be an easy task for avid photographers.

Other Attractions in Turin

Another sight that visitors to Turin shouldn’t miss is the Palatine Towers. A city gate in actuality, this Roman era relic is easily the best preserved fortification of its kind from the days of the Old Empire, as it was constructed in the 1st century BCE, with only cosmetic refurbishments being done to the structure over the 2,000 years that followed.

It had been slated to be torn down in the 18th century in the name of urban renewal, but fortunately cooler heads prevailed, thereby allowing present and future generations to gaze upon a structure that once guarded Turin in the days of the Romans.

Turin is home to Italian car giant FIAT, so it shouldn’t be a surprise that the Museo Nazionale dell’Automobile is located here.

Boasting a collection of 200 vehicles from eight different nations, gearheads of all varieties will be kept busy exploring the various classic automobiles that have been conceived over the years.

From the first Bernardi’s that first hit Italian roads in the late 19th century, to the best Ferrari’s to ever roll off the assembly line here, there is much to love.

Finally, visiting Juventus Stadium is an experience that any avid sports fan will appreciate, especially on a game day.

Home to the storied and uber successful Serie A team of the same name, sitting in the home section of the stands here will have you surrounded by chanting, singing fans that wear their love for their team on their chests, sleeves and scarves.

In addition to watching the game, a shopping arcade houses stores and restaurants across from the stadium, and a museum chronicles the history of a club that is dear and dear to many Italians.